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05 April 2016

Head of French Police talks terrorism with INTERPOL Chief during visit

LYON, France – Director General of the French National Police, Jean-Marc Falcone, has met with INTERPOL Secretary General Jürgen Stock to address the global threat of foreign terrorist fighters and the need for increased information exchange.

Secretary General Stock and Director General Falcone – who was accompanied by Mireille Ballestrazzi, Central Director of the French Judicial Police and President of INTERPOL – discussed how INTERPOL and France can further collaborate on national, regional and global counter-terrorism initiatives.

After terrorist attacks rocked Paris in January and November 2015, the French authorities made full use of INTERPOL’s global policing capabilities and tools to assist their investigations.

“I am pleased with the discussions held during today’s meeting, strengthening the close ties between the French police and INTERPOL in the face of the challenges posed by terrorism and organized crime,” said Mr Falcone.

Calling France ‘a model partner’ on exchanging information through INTERPOL channels, Secretary General Stock highlighted how France is one of the top countries sharing data with INTERPOL’s Foreign Terrorist Fighters database, which currently contains information on some 5,500 individuals.

“The movement of foreign terrorist fighters poses one of the greatest security challenges to the safety of citizens worldwide.

“Timely and complete information sharing amongst law enforcement internationally is the only way to detect and prevent the movement of dangerous terrorists, and I applaud the French authorities for making this a key priority in their counter-terrorism activities,” said the INTERPOL Chief.

In addition, Mr Stock noted how France has taken an active role in combating terrorism worldwide, pointing to the country’s involvement in counter-terrorism operations in the Sahel region of Africa.

Also discussed during the visit was the need for more effective coordination between INTERPOL and Europol to reduce existing gaps in information sharing among European and non-European countries.