All news
|
Print
19 February 2016

INTERPOL conference aims to put brakes on international car crime

BANGKOK, Thailand – The growing links between cybercrime and organized vehicle crime was the focus of an INTERPOL conference which brought together experts from law enforcement and the private sector.

With the majority of modern vehicles equipped with a range of electronic devices such as sensors and infotainment systems, although useful for drivers and passengers this connectivity also presents increased opportunities for criminals attempting to gain access to steal data or sabotage a vehicle.

To address this issue, delegates acknowledged the need to develop strategic cooperation between the INTERPOL-coordinated vehicle expert network and internationally recognized cybercrime units in order to better meet the challenges of high-technology in modern motor vehicles.

The 140 participants representing 46 countries, 20 private entities and five international organizations who attended the three-day (16 –18 February) INTERPOL Global Conference on Vehicle Crime also addressed the impact of illicit trade in spare parts and car trafficking routes.

With more than 7.2 million entries, INTERPOL’s Stolen Motor Vehicles (SMV) database provides a unique global platform. In 2015 alone it was checked nearly 150 million times resulting in the identification of around 123,000 vehicles worldwide.

Most recently, the INTERPOL-coordinated operation Adwenpa undertaken to strengthen border controls along the Abidjan-Lagos corridor in Western Africa underlined the global nature of car theft.

Among the vehicles recovered were a Maserati and two Range Rovers from Italy, one of which had been reported stolen in 2010, as well as a Mini from France and a BMW from Canada.

As part of its Formatrain network, INTERPOL brings together public and private sector specialists to train officers around the world in vehicle theft investigation techniques with more than 20 regional training courses conducted in 2015.