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INTERPOL Cybercrime Capacity Building Project in Latin America and the Caribbean

INTERPOL is implementing a two-year (2015-2017) project aiming to enhance the capacity of selected member countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to combat cybercrime, funded by the Government of Canada.

Through the Cybercrime Capacity Building Project in Latin America and the Caribbean, INTERPOL has built upon existing networks and best practices to enhance international police cooperation on cybercrime cases, and empower participating countries to communicate and collaborate through integrated training and operational activities.

The countries involved in this project are Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, Dominican Republic, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Sint Maarten, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos.

Throughout the project, a key aim has been to integrate INTERPOL’s cutting-edge cybercrime expertise with the unique conditions in the region, in order to best serve the needs of law enforcement in the participating countries.

Needs assessment surveys were conducted, along with 13 rapid cyber assessment visits to the Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, Sint Maarten, St Lucia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Colombia, Panama and Cuba. The aim of these visits was to assess existing infrastructure available to national law enforcement agencies to counter cybercrime and to gain a clear overview of their training, operational and technical capacity ahead of the implementation of the training phase.

In parallel, a number of high-level meetings served as additional needs-gathering exercises to ensure the topics covered during the following phases of the project correspond to those needs.

Participating countries

“It is a multi-billion dollar industry that targets individuals, financial institutions, intellectual property holders, governments and critical infrastructure. The Internet has no border and neither does cybercrime.”

Marie Legault, High Commissioner of Canada in Barbados, speaking at the 3rd Americas Working Group on Cybercrime for Heads of Units