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Border management

Fighting terrorism and transnational crime through effective border management.

Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database

INTERPOL’s database of Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) enables INTERPOL National Central Bureaus (NCBs) and other authorized law enforcement entities – such as immigration and border control officers – to ascertain the validity of a travel document (passports, identity documents, visas) in seconds.

The SLTD database was created in 2002, following the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks in the USA, in order to help member countries secure their borders and protect their citizens from terrorists and other dangerous criminals using fraudulent travel documents. 

How it works

Details of stolen and lost passports are submitted directly to the STLD database by INTERPOL NCBs and law enforcement agencies via INTERPOL’s I-24/7 secure global police communication system. Only the country which issued a document can add it to the database.

Law enforcement officials at INTERPOL NCBs and other locations with access to INTERPOL’s databases through the I-24/7 system – such as airports and border crossings – can query the passports of individuals travelling internationally against the SLTD, and immediately determine if the document has been reported as lost or stolen so they can take the necessary actions.

INTERPOL is not automatically notified of all passport thefts occurring worldwide, and the SLTD database is not connected to national lists of stolen or lost passports. As such, information on national statistics must be requested directly from the country in question.

Statistics

Starting with a few thousand records from just 10 countries, the SLTD database has grown exponentially. 

  • 174 countries contribute to the database which contains more than 68 million records;
  • From January to September 2016 it was searched more than 1,243,000,000 times, resulting in more than 115,000 positive responses, or ‘hits’.

Extending access to SLTD

Despite the potential availability of the STLD database, not all countries systematically search the database to determine whether an individual is using a fraudulent passport.

In order to increase the use of the SLTD database worldwide, INTERPOL encourages each member country to extend access to the I-24/7 network – and through it access to its criminal databases including the STLD – to major airports, border crossings and other strategic locations. This requires the installation of technical equipment or specialized software.

To help identify and stop criminals from using lost or stolen travel documents long before they get to the airport or the border, INTERPOL has developed I-Checkit. This initiative allows trusted partners in the airline industry to submit travel documents for screening against the SLTD database when customers book a plane ticket.

A positive ‘hit’ will be relayed to law enforcement, to take any necessary actions.

Advice for travellers

Do not attempt to travel with a document that you have reported as lost or stolen.

Once you have declared your travel document as lost or stolen to your national authorities, it is cancelled and considered invalid. The details of the document are passed on to INTERPOL and entered into the SLTD database. Border officials in INTERPOL's member countries can screen passenger information directly against the SLTD database. Selected airlines can submit the document details through I-Checkit for screening.

If you try to travel with an invalid document, entry or boarding is denied. The travel document is seized to prevent its future use and you cannot travel.

View the travel safe infographic

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I-Checkit
An innovative tool to detect and prevent illicit transactions.

Advice for travellers

Do not attempt to travel using a document that you have reported as lost or stolen.

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