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08 October 2004 - Media release

INTERPOL General Assembly adopts new anti-crime measures.

Delegates endorse ways to boost world police cooperation.


CANCUN, Mexico - INTERPOL's annual General Assembly ended with delegates endorsing a number of important resolutions aimed at improving efficiency and cooperation among the world's police as they combat international crime.

'We share a heavy burden,' Secretary Ronald K. Noble. Noble told delegates. 'To a large extent, the well-being of society depends on our success. We have the obligation to live up to this responsibility, by constantly trying to find new ways to combat international crime and terrorism.'

Delegates endorsed INTERPOL's three core functions, which are to provide police in member countries with a secure global communications system, operational data services and operational police support. Among other measures agreed upon during the four-day meeting of INTERPOL member nations in Cancun:

  • the need for wider police access to INTERPOL's databases in order to better help law enforcement officials combat trans-border crime around the world
  • recognition of terrorism as a threat to all member countries and endorsement of plans for development of a bioterrorism programme
  • a new interpretation of Article 3 of INTERPOL's constitution that will allow international wanted persons notices to be issued for individuals suspected of active membership in a terrorist organization
  • to strengthen support for INTERPOL Incident Response teams in the event of major terrorist attacks or other major criminal events
  • new rules governing access of intergovernmental organizations to INTERPOL's Orange Notices , introduced in 2004 to warn of potential threats posed by disguised weapons, parcel bombs and other dangerous objects or materials
  • approval of Tajikistan's application for membership, making Tajikistan the nd member country of INTERPOL
  • an agreement to be signed with the International Criminal Court to improve co-operation and to allow the court access to INTERPOL's communications network and databases
  • a 12.36 per cent increase in the organization's 2005 budget, as well as a commitment to continue the development of performance and management controls. INTERPOL's 2005 budget is nearly 35 million euros.

INTERPOL's 73rd INTERPOL General Assembly from October 5-8 brought together almost 500 high-ranking police officers, law enforcement officials and security experts from 143 countries. INTERPOL is the world's largest international police organization and was founded in 1923 to help police fight trans-border crime.