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Access blocking

Criteria for inclusion in the “Worst of”-list

The “Worst of”-list contains domains evaluated and found to be online and distributing child sexual abuse material. All domains have been checked and verified by at least two different countries/agencies under the  CIRCAMP umbrella, for instance Danish national police and INTERPOL. The domains entered into in the “Worst of”-list of domain contain images and movies which fit the following criteria:

  • The children are “real”. Sites containing only computer generated, morphed, drawn or pseudo images are not included.
  • The ages of the children depicted in sexually exploitative situations are (or appear to be) younger than 13 years.
  • The abuses are considered severe by depicting sexual contact or focus on the genital or anal region of the child.
  • The domains have been online within last three months.
  • The domains have been reviewed and found to fulfill the above criteria by two independent countries/agencies or more.

In most countries a child is anyone younger than 18, and images or films of persons defined as a child in a sexual context is punishable to possess, distribute and sometimes view. Hence, domains that are not blocked by the “worst of”-list are not necessarily legal to access in your country.

Blocking that appears to be wrongful

A whole domain is deemed illegal if any part of it is found to contain sexual abuse material with children. Even one image of a child that fits the above criteria will be enough to classify the whole domain as illegal until the illegal material is removed. This illegal content may not be immediately visible (it could be hidden with the exact location communicated only to certain individuals), making the blocking appear to be wrongful. This is not the case and INTERPOL will have the illegal information stored for evidence purposes. Relevant authorities will have access to the evidence through established police channels.

The responsibility for content made available online solely rests on the domain owner, regardless of who placed the material on the domain. The primary goal of blocking access to child sexual abuse material is to protect the rights of the children being depicted, while the secondary goal is to prevent illegal viewing, possession and distribution of the said material.