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13 April 2011 - Media release

UN Security Council resolution underscores role of INTERPOL in securing maritime piracy prosecutions

NEW YORK – The United Nations Security Council has passed a Resolution which aims to boost anti-piracy efforts off the coast of Somalia by urging all member countries to co-operate with INTERPOL to secure successful prosecutions.

Resolution 1976 (2011) is the second Resolution which the Security Council has adopted in the past six months where working with INTERPOL has been highlighted as an important factor in enhancing efforts to effectively address maritime piracy crimes.

Key areas highlighted in the Resolution include the need for countries to criminalize piracy under domestic law; to investigate and prosecute individuals who illegally finance, plan, organize or profit from pirate attacks off the Somali coast, and the importance of collecting, preserving and transmitting evidence of acts of piracy and armed robbery with guidance from INTERPOL.

The UN Resolution, adopted on Monday, was welcomed by INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble as an important step in the international community's ability to better address the problem of maritime piracy and bring those involved before the courts.

"Ensuring that evidence is properly gathered, handled and preserved is the most fundamental part of any investigation, and is especially true for acts of maritime piracy when dealing with multiple offenders not only on the high seas, but also in identifying those behind these criminal organizations," said Mr Noble.

"This unanimously adopted Resolution by the UN Security Council, which further builds on their previous actions, is a clear sign that member countries need to make sure that the basics are in place and that they work with law enforcement professionals such as INTERPOL to bring criminals to justice, and we look forward to providing whatever support necessary to make this happen," concluded the INTERPOL Chief.

INTERPOL's longstanding commitment to tackling maritime piracy saw the world police body announce in February this year the launch of a project to provide essential equipment and training to law enforcement across East African countries with EUR 1.6 million funding from the European Commission.

In November 2010, the UN Security Council unanimously endorsed a Resolution which 'urges states, in co-operation with INTERPOL and Europol, to further investigate international criminal networks involved in piracy off the coast of Somalia, including those responsible for illicit financing and facilitation'.