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29 July 2011 - Media release

First-time visit to Skopje by INTERPOL Secretary General underlines international police cooperation

SKOPJE – In his first mission to the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble has met with senior government and police officials to recognize the country’s contribution to global policing cooperation.

During the two-day visit, in addition to discussions with the Minister of Internal Affairs Gordana Jankuloska and Director of Police Ljupčo Todorovski, Secretary General Noble also met with staff at the INTERPOL National Central Bureau in Skopje and other senior law enforcement officials.

A success highlighted during discussions was NCB Skopje’s significant contribution to INTERPOL’s Project BESA, targeting organized crime groups in South East Europe and which has so far resulted in more than 300 arrests, the seizure of more than three quarters of a ton of illegal drugs and the recovery of more than 120 firearms and 20 kilos of explosives.

“The transnational crime threats which are faced by every country cannot be dealt with in isolation, which is why our cooperation with INTERPOL is so important and have already brought significant results.” said Minister Jankuloska.

“We will continue to work with INTERPOL to identify areas where we can collaborate even more closely, for the benefit of our citizens and those around the world.”

Mr Todorovski said that real time access to INTERPOL’s databases, ‘enabled national police to more effectively protect its borders and tackle all forms of organized crime, particularly drug trafficking.’

As part of their commitment to support international police cooperation, INTERPOL Skopje has already seconded two officers to work at the INTERPOL General Secretariat headquarters – one in the Forensic and Technical Databases unit and the second in the Criminal Analysis Unit.

Secretary General Noble said that their efforts and those of their colleagues in NCB Skopje played an important role in supporting law enforcement across the globe.

“INTERPOL works to support its member countries and we are more effective in this when in turn we are supported by our member countries, particularly through the secondment of officers,” said Mr Noble.

“My visit to Skopje has provided me with an insight into not only the work of the National Central Bureau, but just as importantly, how they are supported by a range of policing units which are dedicated to combating all forms of national and transnational crime,” added the head of INTERPOL.

Mr Noble’s mission to Skopje follows visits to the INTERPOL General Secretariat by Minister Jankuloska and most recently Director of Police Todorovski who in his capacity as President of the Southeast Europe Police Chiefs Association, chaired the group’s conference which was hosted by INTERPOL in December 2010.