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09 November 2011 - Media release

Chinese Vice-Minister’s visit to INTERPOL underlines role of international law enforcement cooperation

LYON, France – China’s Vice-Minister for Public Security, Li Dongsheng, has met with INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters to discuss security measures aimed at enhancing international cooperation against transnational crime.

The visit by Vice-Minister Li provided an opportunity to review key transnational organized crime issues such as human trafficking, drugs trafficking – particularly heroin trafficking in the Golden Triangle region of Southeast Asia – illegal football gambling and INTERPOL’s Intellectual Property Rights Programme.

"Chinese authorities fully recognize the vital role INTERPOL plays in tackling international crime in all its forms, through the effective cooperation of police forces around the world," said China's Vice-Minister for Public Security, Li Dongsheng.

Secretary General Noble cited China’s involvement in projects against Asian organized crime networks, especially as a key participating country in Operations SOGA I (2007), SOGA II (2008) and SOGA III (2010) against football gambling, as examples of China’s active involvement in international police collaboration. In total, the combined three SOGA operations resulted in nearly 7,000 arrests, the seizure of more than USD 26 million in cash and the closure of illegal gambling dens which handled bets worth more than USD 2 billion.

“International police cooperation with China is vital not just for the security of its citizens but also for Asia and beyond the region, at a time when globalization has witnessed both the expansion and diversification of transnational crime,” said Secretary General Noble.

In addition, an INTERPOL Major Events Support Team (IMEST) deployed as part of the security arrangements for the World Student Games in Shenzhen last August provided a range of support services both before and during the event, including checks of the names and passports of nearly 18,000 individuals against INTERPOL’s global databases. The IMEST support provided for the Universiade was the third such deployment requested by China, following support provided for the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou.

“China has consistently demonstrated its support for international police cooperation. It understands that the transnational crime threats which are faced by every country cannot be dealt with in isolation,” added the head of INTERPOL.

A review of progress on the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation due to open in Singapore in early 2014, as well as of the INTERPOL Travel Document which will facilitate the international travel of INTERPOL officials when assisting in transnational investigations or urgent deployments, also topped the agenda during Mr Li’s visit.