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05 March 2013 - Media release

Turning analysis into action focus of INTERPOL workshop for Americas and Southeast Asia

MONTREAL, Canada – More than 50 senior law enforcement officials from the Americas and Southeast Asia have gathered in Montreal for a criminal intelligence workshop focused on combating drug trafficking and organized crime.

The three-day workshop (5-7 March), organized by INTERPOL in collaboration with the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the National Central Bureau in Ottawa, will also highlight counter-terrorism issues and the connections between the different types of crimes.

The meeting aims to increase awareness of the scale of illicit drug trafficking and organized crime, share national perspectives on the current state of criminal intelligence analysis and look at the legal tools and operational aspects of international cooperation and mutual assistance. Participants will learn common analytical techniques, consider the latest technology tools and discuss practical applications of intelligence analysis in their regions.

“Intelligence is key to any kind of investigation, whether it is in the field of counter-terrorism, organized crime or trafficking in drugs,” said INTERPOL’s Executive Director of Police Services, Jean-Michel Louboutin.

“I see dedicated experts and professionals, coming from different backgrounds and different regions of the world, gathered around a shared objective: making the most of international cooperation to best address these transnational threats,” concluded Mr Louboutin.

By bringing together law enforcement officers from different regions to share experiences and best practices, the workshop seeks to increase analytical capacity, standardize how criminal intelligence is used worldwide and promote international cooperation.

“Combating these types of crime requires an integrated and intelligence-led approach. This dialogue with our international partners allows us to draw a more comprehensive picture of the organized crime landscape,” said RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson, who is also a Delegate for the Americas on INTERPOL’s Executive Committee.

“Through these exchanges with the larger policing community, we can mutually enhance our analytical, investigative and preventive techniques by collaboratively fighting criminality at its highest level on an international scope.’’

“This capacity building programme will strengthen the skills of the international law enforcement community, in order to enhance our collective ability to utilize best practices in the processing and sharing of criminal intelligence. The ultimate goal is to turn those skills into strong operational investigations of INTERPOL Red Notice targets and other criminal investigations,” INTERPOL’s Director of Capacity Building and Training, Dale Sheehan said.

Countries and territories attending the workshop are: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao, Dominican Republic, Dominica, El Salvador, Indonesia, Jamaica, Malaysia, Nicaragua, Panama, Philippines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Sint Maarten, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos.